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HENRY ROLLINS GET IN THE VAN PDF

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Get this from a library! Get in the van. [Henry Rollins]. Submit a new link · Submit a new text post · Get an ad-free experience with special benefits, and directly support Reddit. get reddit premium. PDF - Get in the Van. As a member of the seminal punk band Black Flag, Henry Rollins kept detailed tour diaries that form the basis of Get in the Van. Rollins's.


Henry Rollins Get In The Van Pdf

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As a member of the seminal punk band Black Flag, Henry Rollins kept detailed tour diaries that form the basis of Get in the Van. Rollins's observations range. Editorial Reviews. dutytowarn.info Review. A day-by-day journal from the journals of the Get in the Van - Kindle edition by Henry Rollins. Download it once and. Editorial Reviews. From the Inside Flap. s is an artist whose legendary, no-holds- barred His album Get in the Van won the Grammy for Best Spoken Word Album for As an actor, he has appeared in The Chase, Johnny Mnemonic, Heat.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover.

I thought with excitement. Before I could come to grips with how easy it had all been, a trim and wiry middle-aged man walked over to me, nodding at my bass. His name was also Greg, but he said that Ginn and the others simply called him Drummer. Know how you just want to really feel the earth sometimes?

Drummer seemed shocked. A funny tingling feeling permeated my gut. I realized that, either serendipitously or intuitively, I had arrived in Taylor at the perfect moment. They had been trying out bass players for weeks and were hoping to choose someone in the next couple of days.

I asked Drummer how the auditions had been going. Taylor, Texas. A n hour later, I was inside the old empty furniture store alongside Ginn and Drummer. I felt like I was about to have a nervous breakdown. We tuned. Drummer fell right into rhythm. There were no songs, I quickly discovered; the audition would be completely improvised. A couple minutes in, we locked into a tight groove. Ginn played with his eyes closed, his head swiveling around in a trancelike headbang. At first, I thought he was signaling me to stop.

Then I realized he was just paying attention to see where I might be trying to take the song. When he suddenly blasted off on a series of guitar solos, I finally realized, Holy shit! The wordless communication of forming the songs on the spot together was fascinating, and for the first time, I understood the appeal of improvised music. I had been playing with Ginn for less than an hour, and I had already learned something important. After two minute jams, Ginn stopped and spoke for both him and Drummer.

Do you want to stay over and play some more tomorrow? Here I was, over 30 years later, standing in what was basically the same place. A CD with black flag rough mix no vocals scribbled on it in marker sat atop of a pile of CDs, and old newspapers were stacked atop a mixing board.

While Ginn lived a couple blocks away, the rest of the band resided here, just like in the old days. Drummer had a little sleeping spot in one corner—a piece of foam on the ground, walled off for privacy. Drummer motioned to a mat in the center of the room. This was to be my new home. Things were happening fast.

Maybe too fast. Ginn loaded weed into his vaporizer, and Drummer popped open a Lone Star.

Get in the Van: On the Road With Black Flag

They peppered me with questions: Could I relocate to Texas? If so, how soon? Did I have friends over in Austin I could live with in the short-term?

Did I usually hitchhike everywhere? Did I smoke weed? His compliment had traveled nearly a lifetime to get to me. I just sat there grinning. Drummer laid out the situation for me. They were looking for a bass player for not one, but two bands. Ginn, Drummer, and the bassist-to-be would back singer Ron Reyes in the new Black Flag, while also playing in a new band, Good for You, fronted by pro skater Mike Vallely.

After that tour, the band would return to Taylor, and then both Black Flag and Good for You would tour together for months. It was classic Ginn. You ever hear of the Northside Festival? It was one of the biggest NYC rock events of the summer. Greg wants to restart Black Flag.

We want someone who can move here indefinitely and keep on playing past these tours. Like Henry Rollins did so many years ago, the new bass player would have to leave his old life entirely behind.

And like him, I could suddenly and literally see my life changing before my eyes, or at least, the potential of what would happen if I continued down this path: It felt like my year-old dream was tantalizingly close to coming true.

What would I do? Walking aimlessly in one direction, I arrived outside a Walmart at the edge of town. I went in and bought a jug of orange juice and a jar of peanut butter and sat outside the doorway, eating the Peter Pan with a plastic spoon. Some customers stared at me as they exited. Were they satisfied in Taylor? I walked the entire length of town, back to where Main Street hit the railroad tracks, and sat for a long time on the bridge overlooking the train yard.

I wondered where Black Flag would be playing later this year on my 40th birthday. I would no longer have to agonize line by line over my next book or worry about selling stories. And, given his track record, no one could doubt that Ginn was dead serious in his convictions and discipline. We would wake up every day and play his music. Ginn, Drummer, and Mike seemed to me to be utterly free people—fearless, dedicated, highly competent, and on a mission.

I envied them for it, but did their mission align with mine? Its members had fought and won a brutal battle with the larger culture. I admired Ginn for not wanting to repeat the past or look back but was unsure whether his ceaseless experimentation would bring future victories—or even spark any more meaningful battles. There was no way to know except time, and it was now completely up to me how close I wanted to be to whatever happened.

A canopy of stars twinkled across the massive, dark Texas sky. I saw a shooting star trail brightly over town, from east to west, and realized I had absolutely no idea what I wanted anymore.

I went back to my mat at SST and passed out. After nearly two hours of playing, we all headed back to the SST office. Drummer—grinning, barefoot, and skipping down the street—walked on one side of me. Shortly after our walk, Ginn asked if I wanted to stay the night again and play some more the next day.

When I interviewed Dez, he had said that Black Flag had been his favorite band as a kid. There was something about Ginn that made me feel like I would rather do anything than let him down. The couple of people I had told about the tryout had been texting me all morning, telling me I had to drop everything and join Black Flag.

The pressure was sudden and unimaginable, which seems almost absurd when the matter at hand is whether or not to join a band. Then it happened. Doubt had seeped in, and a decision was on the horizon.

My response to Ginn came out in such a heated rush that it surprised even me. Some of this book is downright depressing and self-righteous, but it is what it is.

Rollins could have gotten laid and maybe cooled out a bit during , or at least gotten over himself. The book is what it is, though: What's extraordinary about this book is how it captures how little "success" meant, and how it makes the obvious point of how special Black Flag really was in the s.

The band's music is timeless, to those people who understand it. And how few people actually understood it is even more amazing. It's like being able to see the core of a star: Black Flag was the unreachable white-hot epicenter of the self-immolating scene that was punk rock.

To the outsider, what shone from the surface was often vainly offensive, self-destructive, violent, mindless and temporary. Again, such is youth.

As Black Flag burnt out, so did American punk rock. Bring on the Glam Rock. The cases of cheap beer, bales of skunky weed and back seats full of pussy. Bring on the oceans of girls with "mall bangs" and long-haired guys in patched up jean jackets. No, thank you. And to our benefit, the vacuous musical wasteland that was collapsed under its own excess, while Black Flag's influence underlaid the brief "alternative" respite that, thankfully, soured and collapsed under its own weight in record time in the early 90s.

People who make good music in today's "post-cool" era know what's up. Without the Flag, there would be no "small record labels. So, Mr. Rollins, Mr. Ginn, et al: I have had access to a lot of great music growing up, all because of you. And special thanks for capturing what life was like forging the path for all the good bands today in your tattered notebooks from cargo areas of Ryder trucks.

Jul 17, RandomAnthony rated it liked it Shelves: Okay, I'm going with three stars here only because 2. Get In the Van features three distinct categories: Rollins in the "shed" an actual shed behind Greg Ginn's house, if I'm not mistaken, where he lives when not touring , 2. Black Flag tour diaries. I can't give an unquivoca Okay, I'm going with three stars here only because 2. Those passages sound like the ramblings of a pissed off young person armed with a pen and notebook.

Well, Rollins was one of those, I guess, but Get in the Van is the book through which he purges himself of these juvenilia. You can hear his voice develop over the book's five years; he's processing fear, emotions, and scenarios that are still new. His later work is better, sure, but Get in the Van 's invaluable account of the Black Flag years is still worthwhile, especially if you skim the bad parts.

Apr 27, Lauren rated it liked it Recommends it for: So Henry Rollins is someone I want to spend the rest of my life with. Some think he is a complete asshole, which he is, but that does not bother me much bc it's henry fucking rollins! Maybe you even have the bars tatted up on you. Their painful coolness is what punk rock dreams are based on, but this book shows you in some instances the mundane existence of a touring punk rock band from the 80s.

Oct 16, Doug rated it liked it. There's a moment early in "Get in the Van" where Henry Rollins recalls listening to Black Flag as a fan and both loving and hating the music. Loving it because it was urgent, energetic and evocative of his own pent-up feelings of alienation and boredom. Hating it because, reflexively, the band's very do-it-yourself existence combined with the music to show the young Rollins what he was not - free and self-realized. What follows is Rollins' account, almost all of it pulled from his own journals, There's a moment early in "Get in the Van" where Henry Rollins recalls listening to Black Flag as a fan and both loving and hating the music.

What follows is Rollins' account, almost all of it pulled from his own journals, of what happened when he became the vocalist for the band that he both loved and hated.

And perhaps appropriately, I left the whole things feeling satisfied and sad. The satisfaction comes from the fact that this is a damn good read, and, in a rare instance, an even better experience as an audiobook. Yep, the Grammy Rollins earned for his narration was well-deserved, as the book comes through the speakers like Rollins' best moments as a vocalist and spoken-word artist - intense, hyper-introspective, standoffish and funny.

The sadness? Probably like a lot of readers in their 30s and beyond, I picked this up in the spirit of re-visiting something.

Black Flag had long since broken up when I heard my first punk record and immediately felt I was being spoken to directly. But just as I embraced the bands I was exposed to in the 90s, I wanted to hear their influences and their influences influences.

That led me to the early moments of American hardcore punk, bands like Minor Threat and, of course, Black Flag. And I loved them just as much, if not more, than the generation of bands that came after.

Like a lot of year old former punkers, I've moved on musically and intellectually. Despite a steadfast love for Bad Religion still my favorite band, I only occasionally dust off my old CDs. I think everyone goes through brief spurts of musical nostalgia. Yet, like I said, I was hit by sadness midway through "Get in the Van. He's writing of the joy of the music and how it superseded all else at that time in his life.

And that was when "Christ, that sounds miserable" turned into "Christ, I've gotten old. I realized that while I was hopefully done with poverty, I was almost assuredly done with that kind of passion. And that made me sad. That's the crux of "Get in the Van. There are numerous ways Rollins shows this desperation - the band's roadie advises him that dog food and white bread is a great cure for hunger, so long as you get it down before tasting it - but there are just as many mentions of the other side.

Often, a story of some degrading moment is ended with "but we got to play. Rollins seems especially intent on describing the band's routine misfortune on its European tours.

All the stories of being put down by terrible bands or being attacked by anti-American skinheads or getting no response from too-cool-for-school English audiences The real thorn in Rollins' paw is Rollins, and it makes for the best part of the book. Through Rollins' own words, we see a wide-eyed kid living the dream of singing in his favorite band turn into an alienated, surly, inward-driven young man.

Get in the Van

Is it the solitude of the road between gigs? The violent conflicts with skinheads? The lack of food, money and shelter?

It's a bit hard, really, to pick at the flaws of a book considering most of the words written were never intended to become a book. It would have been better, narrative-wise, to have less regarding the drag that is Bavarian touring and more on Ginn, the yin to Rollins' yang both musically and in regards to worldview.

It would have been better to have had a less-abrupt end, or at the very least something insightful from the young Rollins to show a transition from his inner conflict. We don't get that, though. LIke any satisfying punk song. Jan 01, Mark Desrosiers rated it liked it Shelves: As a misanthrope and a solipsist, young Henry Rollins is the midpoint between Gene Simmons and Arthur Schopenhauer with whom he bears more than a passing resemblance.

This book chronicles his transformation from an insecure D. Compassion, malice, and egoism the nascent traits that Henry calls his "Discipline, Insanity, and Exile" are vividly enacted here, everything from skinheads interrupting Henry's taking a shit to his As a misanthrope and a solipsist, young Henry Rollins is the midpoint between Gene Simmons and Arthur Schopenhauer with whom he bears more than a passing resemblance. Compassion, malice, and egoism the nascent traits that Henry calls his "Discipline, Insanity, and Exile" are vividly enacted here, everything from skinheads interrupting Henry's taking a shit to his rationale for being booze-free "I don't want anything to disturb my signal" I prefer the early scribbling, when he was documenting a DIY scene, putting down the facts.

Round about , entries get squishier, longer, stoopider. Even despite the cannabis haze, I can kinda see why Greg Ginn was ready to remove Henry from his sonic vision. That's where I gave up reading closely. You get less a music memoir than a Spartan punker griping and philosophizing as fast as his empty stomach and the coffee grinds between his teeth will allow. Typical of austere solipsists: Henry omits LOTS of groovy band details and trivia. Hell, you barely notice that d.

Great photos though. May 23, Greg rated it did not like it. I even listened to Black Flag semi-regularly at the time. Henry Rollins is just another angry middle class white kid who was in the right place at the right time to get sort-of famous.

That was my opinion going into the book, and I didn't read anything to change that opinion. Feb 17, Lani rated it it was ok Shelves: Henry Rollins is kind of an asshole. I'm not sure why I would be surprised that when he was in his early 20s he was an entitled self-centered and pompous asshole.

Couldn't finish it, spent too much time rolling my eyes and convincing myself that Rollins has grown up by now. He also has written several books, has acted in a number of films, and does spoken word shows. I am a huge fan of Black Flag and, prior to reading this book, have seen many of his spoken word shows on the internet. I immediately connected with everything Henry Rollins said and I soon began to dig deeper into his many careers and works of art.

I decided I had to read one of his books, and I chose this one first because it seemed to be v Henry Rollins was the singer of Black Flag and Rollins Band. I decided I had to read one of his books, and I chose this one first because it seemed to be very real. The book itself is a journal Rollins kept during his time in Black Flag.

The book revolves around the six or seven years Rollins was the singer of Black Flag. If you are a Black Flag fan, this book is a must. Even if you're not a fan of the music, read the book anyway. The music is only a small part of the book. The point of the story is about the life of Henry Rollins, which is very interesting to learn about.

I was really able to connect with the thing Rollins said, whether it was in books, song lyrics, or spoken word, I very quickly realized how intelligent this man really is. There are plenty of very beautiful quotes in the book, but there is one that sums everything up nicely: I feel confused and resolved at the same time.

My thoughts and dreams plague me and keep me from sleeping. I feel at ease with alienation. With these by my side, everything is everything. My eyes just froze. Henry Rollins managed to say everything I was feeling.

Get in the Van: On the Road With Black Flag by Henry Rollins

For a long time, I was trying to figure myself out. This book,and this quote especially, really helped me. I adore the style which Henry Rollins approaches his writing with.

He says things so simply and straightforwardly, yet with so much thought and complexity behind it. I respect that a lot. I would recommend this book to most everyone. I wouldn't advise anyone under the age of 10 to read this book. There is a lot of graphic language and sexual content that kids under the age of 10 probably wouldn't understand.

It gets very morbid towards the end. I love it. I think it contributes to the beauty and reality of the story, but kids wouldn't understand it.

Get in the van

Also, I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone who isn't angry about something. Anger is very important. This book capitalizes on the importnace of anger. I love this book and I respect Mr. Rollins very much. I recommend that everyone who wishes to be exposed to the harsh reality very straightforwardly and quickly read this book.

I wanted to, and was very satisfied with the results. Feb 25, Tony rated it liked it Shelves: Not sure why I'd never read this cover-to-cover before, I've certainly dipped into friends' copies numerous times over the years. I guess it's largely because heresy coming I mean, yeah, some great songs here and there, but it just generally wasn't ever a sound that connected with me.

But in the last few years I've met him a few times at various book and film events here in DC, and found him to be very p Not sure why I'd never read this cover-to-cover before, I've certainly dipped into friends' copies numerous times over the years.

But in the last few years I've met him a few times at various book and film events here in DC, and found him to be very personable, amusing, insightful, and intelligent. So I finally sat down to read this diary of his time in Black Flag from cover to cover. I suppose you have to give him credit for putting himself completely out there, warts and all -- and there are so very many warts.

More than anything, the diary entries read like those of a prisoner or addict. The day to day life of being in the band is shown to be terrible and miserable for most of their existence. Yet at the same time, the only time he ever feels anything is when he's up on stage. But that also sounds utterly awful -- being spit on, punched, groped -- it's like a hardcore version of Fight Club.

I kept having to remind myself how young he was at the time, but it's hard to get through. The photos are pretty cool, but I would have liked to see more of the entire band, and fewer solo shots of him -- those get very repetitive. I suppose the book is worth checking out if you've got an interest in Black Flag or Rollins, but be forewarned, it is a depressing couple of years.

May 04, Daniel rated it liked it. I have mixed feelings about this one. I think Henry Rollins is a fascinating guy and I had high expectations before reading. My first impression was the difference between the twenty-something Rollins and the fifty-something Rollins.

The younger one is a bleak misanthropist. The older one, as I've seen in recent footage, is more at ease with himself and others and is definitely wiser. I think his journal entries are a great documentation of his time in Black Flag. I didn't like the repetition of I have mixed feelings about this one. I didn't like the repetition of feelings, thoughts and ideas throughout the book, but I guess that's what it's like being on the road with a punk band: Way too repetitive but real and honest.

The prose poems and imagination of young Rollins show his knack for brutal and visceral brilliance, even if they're a little green. He's obviously a well-read person. Personally, I wanted to read more about the band and the misadventures and less about Rollins' antagonism and introspection. It's definitely not for everyone. I'd recommend it only to Rollins and Black Flag fans in particular and Punk fans in general. Despite my complaints, I consider Rollins a man to look up to.

Feb 17, Joseph rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: I've owned this book since the late '90s, when I was a teen getting into punk rock.

When I bought "Get in the Van" in early , the history of punk rock especially American Hardcore Punk was still spoken in whispers. It was very hard to find out more about punk rock bands than it is today. This book is Henry Rollins' journals while he was the fourth and last singer of the great Black Flag I've owned this book since the late '90s, when I was a teen getting into punk rock.

This book is Henry Rollins' journals while he was the fourth and last singer of the great Black Flag from , and documents his perspective, thoughts, feelings, and adventures with the band. All I can say is pick up the book and read it. Since the second edition came out there's more entries, flyers, pictures, and stories. This book is the perfect companion piece to the Black Flag discography, and once you read it you'll realize why this band is one of the most revered, hated, misunderstood, and influential bands of both punk and rock history.

Oct 27, catechism rated it really liked it Shelves: There is a reason most of us do not publish the diaries we keep when we are teenies, and that reason is paragraph after paragraph about how the world is cold, no one understands me, maybe I'll cut myself for a while, everything is terrible, I hate the whole world and they hate me back, my girlfriend just broke up with me long-distance and I will be ALONE FOREVER.

That said! I enjoyed the hell out of it! It's a great l There is a reason most of us do not publish the diaries we keep when we are teenies, and that reason is paragraph after paragraph about how the world is cold, no one understands me, maybe I'll cut myself for a while, everything is terrible, I hate the whole world and they hate me back, my girlfriend just broke up with me long-distance and I will be ALONE FOREVER. It's a great look at the early underground music scene, and it made me incredibly grateful that there were people in the world willing to bleed and starve and fight for their music, and even MORE grateful that I am not one of those people.

This is the only thing of Henry Rollins's I've ever read, and it was pretty righteous. But when he gets into a funk, that may last for months, the book drags along with it. There are still brilliant insights and passages from it, and it gives the music a whole new spin too, in a lot of ways.

My only word of caution in reading this book, is the following: Henry Rollins is a very angry man. He has the largest neck This is the only thing of Henry Rollins's I've ever read, and it was pretty righteous. He has the largest neck in rock 'n' roll, and when he was 18, it was even larger, and he was even angrier. If you drink alcohol, abstain whilst reading this book, or head my warnings doubly so. If you like Rollins, even just a little, you owe yourself to read that book. I have a paragraph from page tattooed on my right forearm.

The initial inception must be pure. All energy must be put to use. The end must never leave your sight. Complete destruction must be had. You must maintain drive that goes beyond obsession, beyond purpose, beyond reason.

Every movement must be in the forward direction. When in the woods, seek the clearing. The path shines so bright it's almost blinding.

It's a If you like Rollins, even just a little, you owe yourself to read that book. It's a great recollection of punk rock memories and a D. Y survival guide for young intellectuals. It's proudly taking its place on my shelves. Jan 28, Bill rated it it was amazing. His voice and story telling carry a lot of the character and experience from the events depicted in the book. It is taken from his journals during those years of touring with Black Flag.

There is a rhythm to the audiobook as tours grind on and turn him inward to reflect on his attitudes and begin to break him down into just touching base with the journal as he approaches burnout at the end of a grinding tour with little stable I've seen Rollins Band and two Henry Rollins Spoken Word shows live.

There is a rhythm to the audiobook as tours grind on and turn him inward to reflect on his attitudes and begin to break him down into just touching base with the journal as he approaches burnout at the end of a grinding tour with little stable sleep and food.

I enjoyed the Grammy winning audiobook version of this title read by Henry Rollins. May 10, Jennifer Ozawa rated it liked it Shelves: Henry Rollins is one of my personal heroes. I would love nothing more than to sit for hours with him and talk about everything. I made it a personal goal to read all of his books. This book was on my to-read list for years. While Henry has evolved into an erudite, articulate voice, he was not always. At the writing of "Get in the Van", he was in his early twenties and had barely made it out of high school.

He was angry, disaffected and disconnected. Much of this book is a portrait of a really ang Henry Rollins is one of my personal heroes.

Much of this book is a portrait of a really angry person. Young Henry, in fact, is just not very pleasant at all. May 23, Brian Fanelli rated it really liked it. If you want a really honest, detailed account of what it was like to front a punk band in the s, then check out Henry Rollins Get in the Van, a collection of journal entries from his time as Black Flag's front man.

The book addresses the excitement of fronting a band, but also the boredom of being on the road constantly. The entries also detail some of the most brutal fights between the LA police and the punk rockers. Rollins' journals serve as a reminder that punk rock was not always so saf If you want a really honest, detailed account of what it was like to front a punk band in the s, then check out Henry Rollins Get in the Van, a collection of journal entries from his time as Black Flag's front man.

Rollins' journals serve as a reminder that punk rock was not always so safe.

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