Maryland Peace of Mind: Dealing with depression, pregnancy


Peace of Mind: Dealing with Depression and Pregnancy



JENYNE: Having a baby can bring on all kinds of emotions, from happiness and joy to anxiety and stress. And sometimes it can lead to something much more serious – depression. This morning’s topic on peace of mind in Maryland. Joining us is Melanie Dowell by Lanny’s side. She is GBMC’s Doula Her Manager and Parent Education Coordinator. Good morning. >>Good morning. JENYNE: Can you tell me what postpartum depression is and what signs to look for after giving birth? JENYNE: Is it normal to have mood swings? >>It’s absolutely normal. It’s a big adjustment because it’s a new human being we’ve brought back into the family.JENYNE: There’s also postpartum anxiety and postpartum stress. How is it different from postpartum depression? >> For most families the difference is something new. It’s like starting a new job, moving out of state, or doing something different. Trying to adjust to sleep deprivation, cycles, feeding cycles, everything that comes with a newborn. If you struggled with anxiety before having a baby, you’ll be dealing with it during these changes. JENYNE: What are the causes and symptoms and treatment options for each? >> Treatment options are highly dependent on the caregiver. Most mothers seek support groups. Other moms, other families who can talk openly about adjusting to this new cycle. Doctors may treat it with medication, but talk therapy is very important. Mother groups around you should stay away from some of the social media areas. JENYNE: Are some women more likely than others to experience postpartum disorders? >>Yes. Mothers with a history of depression or who have had a previous postpartum period. And that period goes quickly to the onset of pregnancy and can carry over for some mothers. Our hormone levels tend to regulate around six months. There are no frames. There are no magic numbers. JENYNE: Some people think it’s the period immediately after having a baby, but it’s a little longer than you think. >>Absolutely. A lot of things change right after a baby is born. Especially the sleep cycle is changing. Just once it’s adjusted, we’re back on the climb again. There is no specific critical time. Her first two weeks or her four weeks are a good time to get to know the family. JENYNE: I understand that GBMC provides postpartum support services. Please tell me about it. >> On Wednesday we have an amazing program in person via ZOOM. It’s a pregnancy and postpartum support group. One group counts as 9 months. The other is called Count On. There is also a touch baseline. Our moms can call anytime. Knowing they can always touch the base, they can be part of an income group. JENYNE: There is no handbook on motherhood and pregnancy. It’s okay if it’s not okay. Thank you very much for joining us this morning. JENYNE: And as we do each week, if you or someone you know is struggling with mental health issues, please remember that help is available. To connect with mental health resources , call 988. You can also find a list of organizations and other resources at WBALTV.CO.

Peace of Mind: Dealing with Depression and Pregnancy

Having a baby can bring with it all sorts of emotions, from happiness and joy to anxiety and stress. That’s the topic of our “Maryland Pieces of Mind” with Melanie Dowell aka “Lanny”. She is the Doula Manager and Parent Education Coordinator at Greater Baltimore Medical Center.

Having a baby can bring with it all sorts of emotions, from happiness and joy to anxiety and stress. That’s the topic of our “Maryland Pieces of Mind” with Melanie Dowell aka “Lanny”. She is the Doula Manager and Parent Education Coordinator at Greater Baltimore Medical Center.



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